Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
View Cart
 
 
Products
America
GM Cars
2015 Vintage Marvel Comics Calendar
2015 Desktop Marvel Calendar
2014 Vintage Marvel Comics Calendar
2014 Desktop Marvel Calendar
Vintage Marvel Captain America#100 Journal Book
Vintage Marvel The Avengers #1 Journal Book
Vintage Marvel Spider-Man #100 Journal Book
Vintage Marvel Iron Man #1 Journal Book
Vintage Marvel Iron Man Journal Book
Vintage Marvel Spider-Man Journal Book
Sci-Fi
Sheet Music
Westerns
Air Force
Alabama
Arizona
Arizona State
Arkansas
Army
Auburn
Baylor
Boston College
Brown
BYU
Cal/Berkeley
Clemson
Colorado
Colorado State
Cornell
Dartmouth
Duke
Florida
Florida State
Georgia
Georgia Tech
Harvard
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Iowa State
Kansas
Kansas State
Kentucky
LSU
Maryland
Miami
Michigan
Michigan State
Minnesota
Mississippi
Mississippi State
Missouri
Navy
NC State
Nebraska
North Carolina
Northwestern
Notre Dame
Ohio State
Oklahoma
Oklahoma State
Oregon
Oregon State
Penn State
Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh
Purdue
Rice
Rutgers
SMU
South Carolina
Stanford
Syracuse
TCU
Tennessee
Texas
Texas A&M
Texas Tech
Tulane
UCLA
USC
Utah
Vanderbilt
Virginia
Virginia Tech
Wake Forest
Washington
Washington State
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Yale
Delaware
Circus
Pulp Romance
DC Comics
Gourmet
House & Garden
MAD Magazine
Bowl Games
Norma Jeane
Desktop Calendars
Gift Sets
Posters
Journals
Notecards
Reviews
Green
FAQ
About Us
Shipping
Contact
 

2011 Vintage Marvel Comics Calendar


marvelcomics_2011-lg.jpg
  • Collector's Second Edition
  • 12 frame-ready 11"x14" reproductions of classic Marvel Comics covers
  • Large format 11"x15" wire-o calendar opens to 11"x30"
  • Printed on heavy 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • Each month's image perforated for easy framing
  • ISBN: 9781603685320
  • UPC: 724638055965
 
Price: $16.95
 








From the back cover: “A blaze of blue. A crash of crimson. A gleam of gold. The heroes of Marvel Comics bounded and flew and swung into our minds and hearts from richly-colored covers under proudly emblazoned titles that hinted at unparalleled excitement: Fantastic. Amazing. Invincible. Incredible. For over seventy years, Marvel has thrilled readers with some of the most original heroes and villains ever created for comics.” —Dr. Arnold  Blumberg

Celebrate over seventy years of pulse-pounding action with this collection of twelve classic covers from the mighty Marvel Age of Comics, reproduced on heavy, archival-quality 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks. This unique, eco-friendly edition includes images that are perforated to fit an 11"x14" frame. It's a wire-bound collection of archival-quality prints, cleverly disguised as a calendar. "Excelsior!" This is a true 12-month calendar.

About the Images
The images featured in this calendar are archival-quality reproductions of the covers of vintage Marvel Comic books. In some cases the images have been digitally repaired and restored where creases, tears, marks, or other damage would have otherwise distracted from the appreciation of the artwork as it appeared at that time. Some images have been cropped and/or resized to fit this format.

Collector's Series This calendar is part of a collector's series featuring archival-quality reproductions of twelve different vintage Marvel Comic covers each year.

Officially Licensed This is an officially licensed product.

Inside Marvel Comics:

A blaze of blue. A crash of crimson. A gleam of gold. The heroes of Marvel Comics bounded and flew and swung into our minds and hearts from richly-colored covers under proudly emblazoned titles that hinted at unparalleled excitement: Fantastic. Amazing. Invincible. Incredible.

The roots of this phenomenon stretched back to Marvel’s beginnings in the early 40s, when the Human Torch and the Sub-Mariner had several memorable matches, only to join forces against a greater enemy—the Axis. Twenty years later, their successors would also be prone to pummeling each other with little provocation. It also meant guest stars galore when Thor turned up to tackle the Silver Surfer.

It always worked out in the end. The heroes would figure out their true enemy was Dr. Doom or Loki. In a few explosive panels, good would prevail, the heroes would shake hands—or in the case of the Torch and Spidey, toss a few last insults at one another—and go on their way to meet another day and probably have another tussle courtesy of a foe-fueled misunderstanding.

For seventy years, Marvel (or Timely or Atlas) thrilled readers with some of the most original heroes and villains ever created for comics. But it was in the 1960s with the debut of The Fantastic Four that the Marvel Age of Comics truly began. With Stan Lee at the helm during a Silver Age of unprecedented innovation, the Marvel Universe burst into being and expanded throughout the decade into the world’s greatest four-color fantasy factory.


Today, seventy years after the original Human Torch first burned through the cover of Marvel Comics #1, the Marvel Universe is still going strong. But there was never anything like those early days when everything was new, surprises and guest stars around every corner, with every issue dubbed “The Greatest Action-Thriller of All Time!” And it was…but only until the next Marvel comic came along.

These heroes were more complicated…more human. The FF was a family and they squabbled amongst themselves as often as they battled the Mole Man or the Thinker. Spider-Man may have been a glib crusader for justice, but he was just bookish Peter Parker under the mask, troubled by an ailing aunt and constant money problems. And like real people, they could also make mistakes. One of the most frequent blunders was duking it out with their fellow heroes, thanks to a misunderstood word or a devious distraction engineered by a mutual enemy. Stan knew how to make every special appearance into an event, right down to cover blurbs like “Guest-Starring By Special Arrangement with ‘X-Men’ Magazine, The Angel,” as if sensitive negotiations were required when Stan just had to stick his head out of his office door and tell Jack Kirby to draw the Hulk in an issue of Fantastic Four. For kids, there was the added bonus of settling schoolyard debates like “Who would win in a fight—Thing or the Hulk?” Dr. Arnold Blumberg is author or co-author of Pop Culture with Character, Zombiemania, The Big BIG LITTLE BOOK Book, and Howe’s Transcendental Toybox. He has written for Cinescape, EON, Now Playing, The International Journal of Comic Art, Comic Book Marketplace, Borderline, Overstreet’s Fan, and contributes regularly to IGN.com and iFmagazine.com. He previously served as Editor of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide. He holds a doctorate in Communications Design from the University of Baltimore and teaches a course in comic book literature at the University of Maryland. His website is located at atbpublishing.com

The Avengers #4 “Captain America Joins…the Avengers!” March 1964 Cover Art: Jack Kirby, George Roussos: (First modern appearance of Captain America) Who would have expected the star-spangled crusader of World War II to turn up alive and well in the swinging ‘60s? When the Avengers retrieve the Golden Age warrior from a block of ice, Cap finds himself a man out of time with a new world to protect. Bringing back one of Marvel’s most celebrated heroes for a new generation of fans was just one of many ways that the ‘House of Ideas’ regularly defied expectations and broke new ground in the chronicles of comic book history.
(January Image)

Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D #1“Who is Scorpio?” June 1968 Cover Art: Jim Steranko, Sam Rosen:

The surreal, psychedelic cover by Jim Steranko, and the nonstop, high-tech spy action made this one of Marvel’s quintessential ‘60s series. Former World War II sergeant Nicholas Fury, enhanced by the “Infinity Formula” that slows his aging, and wearing a patch over his war-injured eye, is recruited by the secret agency known as S.H.I.E.L.D. (Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law Enforcement Division*), to battle the evil forces of Hydra and his old arch-enemy, Baron Strucker. With high-tech weapons and LMDs (Life Model Decoys), the reinvented Fury became the perfect super-spy for the Marvel universe.
(February Image) 
*CORRECTION: Ack!! The printed commentary for the month of February incorrectly listed the more recent long version for S.H.I.E.L.D.---Strategic Hazard Intervention, Espionage and Logistics Directorate, rather than the original and more appropriate extrapolation---Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law Enforcement Division.  This was a last-minute editorial interjection which was not part of Dr. Blumberg's original commentary, and which he did not have the opportunity to review before we went to press.  We apologize to all our Marvel fans and especially to Dr. Blumberg, who would have spotted the error and pointed out the correct version with both hands tied behind his back, and both eyelids superglued shut.  

The Amazing Spider-Man #39 “How Green Was My Goblin!” August 1966 Cover Art: John Romita:New Spider-Man artist John Romita replaced co-creator Steve Ditko with this landmark issue, and transformed the world of Peter Parker forever, with artwork influenced by years of work on romance comics. The first part of a two-part epic that brought the mystery of the Green Goblin’s identity to an end, the story reveals that the web-slinger’s deadly arch-enemy is none other than industrialist Norman Osborn…his buddy Harry’s father! Finding evil so close to home was just another way that Spidey’s world was turned upside down on a daily basis.
(March Image)
Tales of Suspense #85 “Into the Jaws of Death” ”The Blitzkrieg of Batroc!” January 1967 Cover Art: Glen Colan, Frank Giacol:In this issue of the anthology series that starred both Captain American and Iron Man, ol’ Shellhead’s nemesis, the Mandarin, captures Happy Hogan, thinking the poor guy is actually Iron Man himself! While the ring-wielding mastermind is fooled by a simple case of mistaken identity, Cap’s foe, Batroc the Leaper, is willing to drop his quarrel with the shield-slinging Avenger and team up against Hydra, when he feels the evil organization has violated his sense of honor. Those Marvel villains were always such an unpredictable bunch.
(April Image)
Journey Into Mystery #123 “While a Universe Trembles” December 1965 Cover Art: Jack Kirby, Vince Colletta: The early adventures of Thor are a mind-bending amalgam of Earthbound encounters with the likes of Crusher Creel, the Absorbing Man, and mystical flights of fantasy beyond the Rainbow Bridge, to the fabled realm of Asgard. Sometimes those two worlds collided with a vengeance, as in this issue, when Crusher makes his way to the homeland of the Norse gods, and tries to absorb all of Asgard itself! Meanwhile, Asgardian magic finds its way to Earth and into the hands of the Witch Doctor, via one of the Norn Stones.
(May Image)
Daredevil #1 “The Origin of Daredevil” April 1964 Cover Art: Jack Kirby, Bill Everett:Who else but Marvel would have dared to defy convention, and introduce a superhero with a handicap? Matt Murdock may be blind, but exposure to toxic waste enhances his other senses and turns him into the Man Without Fear—a dedicated crime-fighter that pursues justice as a lawyer by day, and as the horned hero known as Daredevil by night. Matt’s vigilante alter-ego may not always follow the letter of the law, but he struggles to find the right balance as he fights to protect the streets of Hell’s Kitchen.
(June Image)
The Incredible Hulk #1 “The Hulk” May 1962 Cover Art: Jack Kirby, George Roussos: Could a monster ever be a hero? Marvel was already investigating that possibility with Ben Grimm as the rock-skinned Thing in The Fantastic Four, but now they were putting a monster center stage in his own title, instead of merely as a member of an ensemble cast (i.e.: the Defenders). Bruce Banner’s tragic transformation into a hulking gray (and later green) brute was equal parts Jekyll & Hyde and Frankenstein, augmented by Atomic Age science. Hounded by the military and even other superheroes, the Hulk is truly a beast with a heart of gold.
(July Image)
The X-Men #1 “X-Men” September 1963 Cover Art: Jack Kirby, Sol Brodsky: Having already turned unexpected, offbeat characters into heroes such as the misshapen Thing, the wiry Spider-Man, and the green-skinned Hulk, Marvel took the next step by introducing an entire team of shunned outcasts, the mutant X-Men. Led by the wheelchair-bound, telepathic Charles Xavier—a.k.a. Professor X—the original team of Cyclops, Marvel Girl, the Angel, the Iceman and the Beast, battles the metal-manipulating Magneto, and teaches readers that those who are different can just as easily be noble and true. Now who said this wasn’t the Mighty Marvel Age of Positive Social Messages?
(August Image)
Fantastic Four #47 “Beware the Hidden Land!” February 1966 Cover Art: Jack Kirby, Joe Sinnott: Although they fought criminals and cosmic conspirators, the oft-bickering but always-loyal family known as the Fantastic Four, were first and foremost, explorers. One of their astounding journeys uncovers the secret refuge of the Inhumans, a race of mutated beings living apart from the rest of the world. While their silent monarch Black Bolt fights to keep their people safe from humans as well as his own mad brother Maximus, the young Inhuman girl called Crystal would defy generations of tradition by falling in love with that fiery youth, the Human Torch.
(September Image)
Ghost Rider #1 “A Woman Possessed!” September 1973 Cover Art: Gil Kane, Joe Sinnott: Monsters were often some of Marvel’s most unexpected heroes, and in the 1970s, a veritable legion of creepy characters acquired their own comic book series, including werewolves, swamp creatures, Frankenstein’s Monster and even the Prince of Darkness himself, Dracula! Marrying the macabre with mid-20th century motorcycle culture, Ghost Rider gave one of Marvel’s most offbeat creations his own title. Biker Johnny Blaze sells his soul to Mephisto to save his stepfather, and is forced to endure Hell on Earth, transforming when needed into a terrifying engine of vengeance with a flaming skull!
(October Image)
Iron Man #47 “Why Must There Be an Iron Man?” June 1972 Cover Art: Gil Kane, Vince Colletta: Retelling a hero’s origin can often be an easy way to fill an issue when deadlines are tight or another script doesn’t come together as fast as it should, but Marvel never took the easy way out. In this issue, a flashback to Tony Stark’s fateful accident in a foreign land, and his creation of the legendary Iron Man armor that saved his life and turned him into a red-and-gold avenger, became a book-length ‘re-imagining’ years before Hollywood would offer its own interpretation of his first heroic exploits.
(November Image)
The Amazing Spider-Man #100 “The Spider or the Man?” September 1971 Cover Art: John Romita, Frank Giacoia: This was Stan Lee’s final issue as scriptwriter for The Amazing Spider-Man, and what a surreal swan song it was! In an effort to cure himself of his spidery powers and live a normal life with girlfriend Gwen Stacy, Peter Parker drinks a mysterious potion and finds himself fending off a series of deadly dream-world attacks from all his famous foes. When he awakes, he is shocked to discover that he now has four extra arms! How will Spidey and incoming writer Roy Thomas get out of this one?
(December Image)

You might be interested in the following related items:

 
MarvelComics15cal_md.jpg
2015 Vintage Marvel Comics Calendar
 
  • Collector's Sixth Edition
  • 12 frame-ready 11"x14" reproductions of classic Marvel Comics covers
  • Large format 11"x15" wire-o calendar opens to 11"x30"
  • Printed on FSC-certified paper with soy-based inks
  • Each month's image perforated for easy framing
  • ISBN: 9781630360023
  • UPC: 724638060655
Price: $21.95
 
Marvel15dpcmd.jpg
2015 Desktop Marvel Calendar
 
  • Faithful reproductions from the Marvel Age of Comics
  • 3 Months at once viewing
  • Desktop format 7"x7" calendar
  • Each month's image is perforated for easy
    removal to a postcard
  • Printed on heavy FSC-certified paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603689205
  • UPC: 724638059833

Price: $14.95
 
MVAF015P-md.jpg
Vintage Marvel Amazing Fantasy #15 Poster
 
  • Special 70th Anniversary Edition
  • Size: 20"x28"
  • Fits a standard frame
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603684156
  • UPC: 724638054791
Price: $16.95
 
MVCA100P-md.jpg
Vintage Marvel Captain America #100 Poster
 

  • Special 70th Anniversary Edition
  • Size: 20"x28"
  • Fits a standard frame
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603684132
  • UPC: 724638054777
Price: $16.95
 
MVDD001P-md.jpg
Vintage Marvel Daredevil #1 Poster
 

  • Special 70th Anniversary Edition
  • Size: 20"x28"
  • Fits a standard frame
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603684170
  • UPC: 724638054814
Price: $16.95
 
MVFF001P-md.jpg
Vintage Marvel Fantastic Four #1 Poster
 

  • Special 70th Anniversary Edition
  • Size: 20"x28"
  • Fits a standard frame
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603684187
  • UPC: 724638054821
Price: $16.95
 
MVFF059P-md.jpg
Vintage Marvel Fantastic Four #59 Poster
 

  • Special Edition
  • Size: 20"x28"
  • Fits a standard frame
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603686549
  • UPC: 724638057174

Price: $16.95
 
MVIM001P-md.jpg
Vintage Marvel Iron Man #1 Poster
 

  • Special 70th Anniversary Edition
  • Size: 20"x28"
  • Fits a standard frame
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603684200
  • UPC: 724638054845
Price: $16.95
 
MVIM016P-md.jpg
Vintage Marvel Iron Man #16 Poster
 
  • Size: 20"x28"
  • Fits a standard frame
  • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
  • ISBN: 9781603686426
  • UPC: 724638057068
  • Price: $16.95
     
    MVJM083P-md.jpg
    Vintage Marvel Journey Into Mystery #83 Poster
     

    • Special 70th Anniversary Edition
    • Size: 20"x28"
    • Fits a standard frame
    • Printed on 100% recycled paper with soy-based inks
    • ISBN: 9781603684217
    • UPC: 724638054852
    Price: $16.95